The Winston Group is a strategy and research firm dedicated to making ideas matter.

Washington Examiner: “Obama’s leftward lurch poisons hope for consensus”

by Emily O'Connor

Ahead of the 2015 State of the Union address, the WG’s David Winston tells the Washington Examiner what he’ll be looking for, and how voters’ feelings about the role of government have changed:

“I’ll be looking at the State of the Union address to see if [Obama] understood what happened in the last election or whether he just ignores it,” said David Winston, a veteran GOP pollster. “When a party ignores when the American people have spoken, it’s usually a dangerous moment for that party.”

Winston cited exit polls in the last four elections since 2008 when Obama was voted in office. When it comes to whether government should do more or less to solve the nation’s problems, Winston’s polls show a sharp swing against government solutions since Obama was first elected.

In 2008, amid a real estate correction that threatened large financial institutions, 51 percent of those surveyed said they believed government should do more to solve the country’s problems. In 2010, that number shrank to 38 percent. Support for more government intervention in markets was 44 percent in 2012 and 41 percent in 2014.

Read the rest of the story here.

WashEx: “Elections an opportunity, not a mandate, for GOP, polling shows”

by Emily O'Connor

The Washington Examiner highlighted the WG’s post-election analysis “Fix It” in an article describing why the 2014 midterms provided Republicans with an opportunity, rather than a mandate:

“It’s important to understand that the election showed the public is willing to listen to Republican ideas but voters have to be sold on each individual idea first,” Winston explained. “Republicans do not have carte blanche, but they have an electorate that is willing to listen to Republican ideas to fix the country. That is a unique opportunity for any political party.”

…“The brand challenge for Republicans is to turn winning the issues into favorables and expand their midterm majority coalition,” Winston said in his report. “Newt Gingrich once said: ‘Walmart doesn’t get ahead by attacking Sears, but by offering better value.’ That captures the Republican challenge going forward.”

Read the rest of the article here.

Read the stresstips.com version here.

Get the rest of our post-election analysis here.

Washington Examiner: “Survey: Hillary Clinton too liberal for most voters”

by Emily O'Connor

This week, a finding from the Winston Group’s post-election survey was featured in the Washington Examiner’s “Washington Secrets” column –

Ideological Spectrum - 2014

 

Pollster David Winston provided Secrets with his latest analysis that included his trademark political sliding scale that for the first time tested the public’s opinion of Clinton’s political pulse.

He found that on a scale of 1 for liberal to 9 for conservative, voters put Clinton at 3.6, to the left of the House Democratic Caucus and just shy of Obama’s 3.37, the most liberal on the chart. Voters put themselves at a right-of-center 5.79, a yawning 2 points away from Clinton…

“Looking at 2016, the ideological spectrum should [be] concerning for Democrats, especially the likely front-runner Hillary Clinton. The good news for her is voters put her to the right of President Obama. The bad news for her is voters put her significantly to the left of where they put themselves ideologically,” Winston said.

Read the whole story here, or take a look at everything else we covered in our post-election analysis.

“Fix It” – An Analysis of the 2014 Midterm Elections

by Emily O'Connor

 

In the 2014 midterm elections, what did voters tell Washington? “Fix it.”

Read through our in-depth analysis to find out more about what voters want, who comprised the 2014 electorate, and what challenges and opportunities are ahead for both parties.

Access the PDF here.

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National Teacher Attitudes on the Adoption of Common Core State Standards

by David Winston

While teachers’ outlook on Common Core continues to be positive, there are some challenges emerging on the horizon that need to be addressed. By a 2:1 margin (62% approve-31% disapprove) teachers approve of adoption of Common Core State Standards. However, this support is soft as 17% said they strongly approve and 44% said somewhat approve. This overall level of support is basically unchanged from last March, when in a Hart/Winston Group survey, 62% of teachers approved and 32% disapproved.

Additionally, attitudes about approval of state implementation of Common Core has slipped slightly as it went from 66% in March to 60% in July. While the trend is of concern, nonetheless the approval margin is still 2:1 (60-30). Also like overall approval, that approval is soft with 18% strongly approving and 42% somewhat approving.

Finally, and perhaps the most immediate challenge, is that what teachers have heard about Common Core Standards over the last year has not been favorable. Given what teachers said they had heard over the last year, 17% said it made them more favorable, while 32% said it made them less favorable. However, almost half (49%) said that what they had heard had not changed their attitude. Again, this was similar to last March when it stood at 18% more favorable, 32% less favorable, and 49% the same.

This survey occurs as we are in the middle of implementation across the country. Implementation was always seen as a challenging moment, yet 6 out of 10 teachers at this point still approve of how that is occurring. Obviously it would be better if that approval were not as soft as it is. Additionally that softness is complicated by the teacher reaction to what they have heard. Nonetheless, the attitudes are still very positive, but a stronger Common Core narrative is needed to coincide with further implementation to move things forward.

This survey was fielded August 2-3, 2014 for The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. 800 teachers nationally were interviewed.

PDF Version

March 2014 Survey

by Lisa Mathias

PDF Version

February 2014 Survey

by Lisa Mathias

PDF Version

Video: Is America Still Center Right?

by Lisa Mathias

In the first of a new series of short, original videos, we decided to look into whether the American electorate has remained ideologically center-right since the last two presidential elections, or whether voters have shifted to the left. We also explain what this means for Republicans as we go into the 2014 election season.

January 2014 Survey

by Lisa Mathias

PDF Version

December 2013 Survey

by Lisa Mathias

PDF Version

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