The Winston Group is a strategy and research firm dedicated to making ideas matter.

Ripon Forum Features “What America Wants” by David Winston

by Emily O'Connor

Don’t miss the WG’s David Winston’s essay “What America Wants” in the latest edition of the Ripon Forum, discussing how Congress shaped the ’80 presidential campaign – and how it can help shape 2016:

Congressional Republicans can help create a winning general election environment by legislating a dynamic growth agenda, an actionable agenda on issues people care most about. In doing so, they can also put the party and eventual nominee on a path to a majority coalition…

What do Americans want? A plan to bring America back – not next July in Cleveland but starting now.

Read the full essay here.

WashEx: “Hispanic hill looms for GOP”

by Emily O'Connor

How important is winning the Hispanic vote in 2016 and beyond?

“At the national level, as time progresses and as that population segment grows, they’re just going to have increasing importance. That’s a pretty straightforward trend,” GOP pollster David Winston said.

Find out more in the Washington Examiner article about how Republicans in past elections have done among Hispanic voters, and where current candidates stand with this voter group.

LA Times: “In Miami, Sen. Marco Rubio calls 2016 election a ‘generational choice'”

by Emily O'Connor

Last week, Sen. Marco Rubio announced he will be running for President in 2016. The WG’s David Winston pointed out the common challenge facing all of the Republican candidates that will shape the presidential race:

David Winston, a Republican pollster and strategist, said the challenge for Rubio, like all the Republican candidates, will be to deliver a compelling message.

“He’s got to decide who he is, lay out his principles and lay out a vision for the country that people can get behind,’’ Winston said.

Read the rest of the story on Rubio’s campaign launch speech.

 

Politico: In Politics, 40 is the New 50

by Emily O'Connor

Politico’s Maggie Haberman explores the trend of lowering approval ratings among winning political candidates. The WG’s David Winston explains how these candidates, some with ratings in the mid to low forties, are now electable:

“I think what you’re seeing is a reflection of the campaigns … when you’re not doing anything to improve your own personal standing and it’s all about how bad the other person is, then it’s not a race about who has the highest favorables, but it’s a race about who has the highest negatives,” said Republican pollster David Winston.

Read the rest at Politico.

Bloomberg View: How to Waste Money and Annoy Voters

by Emily O'Connor

In Francis Wilkinson’s editorial from Bloomberg View, the WG’s David Winston comments on whether the abundance of political advertising in the 2014 midterm elections has reached a saturation point:

“It depends,” said Republican strategist David Winston. “If it is a new topic or idea people will listen. If it’s just a variation on a familiar theme, then less so as they have already heard it. Hearing a point the 96th time is not likely to generate a different reaction than when it was heard the 73rd time.”

For the rest of the piece, click here.
ralph lauren kids outlet
ralph lauren trainers uk
ralph lauren careers uk
polo ralph lauren cap
polo ralph lauren boxers
polo ralph lauren aftershave
ralph lauren rugby polo
mens ralph lauren polo
red ralph lauren polo

WSJ: On the Campaign Trail, Obama’s Hard to Find

by Emily O'Connor

The Wall Street Journal highlights President Obama’s comparatively quiet role in the 2014 midterm campaigns so far, particularly in Senate races. The Winston Group’s David Winston comments:

David Winston, a Republican strategist, said the White House has a long-term interest in demonstrating that Mr. Obama still has some political capital.

“If there was a sense that he was in a situation where he couldn’t help any Democratic candidate, that’s just not a good setup for his last two years,” Mr. Winston said.

Click here for the full story.

US News: Paul Ryan Won by Staying Cool and Composed

by David Winston

This morning a short opinion piece I wrote in answer to the question of who won last night’s vice presidential debate appeared in U.S. News and World Report.

But there is one very real way in which the vice presidential showdown was a win for Ryan. He came into the night the youngest and least-known member of either ticket. Casual observers were introduced to a competent, mature policy wonk with a strong command of the issues and, perhaps most importantly, a demonstrated ability to remain composed despite the disrespectful bluster of his opponent.

I go on to explain that part of voters’ job is to decide whether they trust a candidate to be second in line for the presidency. Against that standard, Ryan passed with flying colors.

Check out the rest of the article (and other takes on the issue as well) at the U.S. News website.

WSJ: Political Veterans: A ‘Real’ and ‘Testy’ Debate

by Lisa Mathias

The WG’s David Winston contributed to the Wall St. Journal “Washington Wire” blog today, giving his take on how last night’s Vice Presidential Debate went.

An excerpt:

The most frustrating moment was when Ryan was trying to outline historical situations where tax cuts led to economic growth and tax revenue, only to be interrupted by both Mr. Biden and moderator Martha Raddatz. This is a central economic argument between the two campaigns and we never got a chance to hear the differences. It was a real disappointment.

To read more, turn to blogs.wsj.com.

David Winston on Jansing & Co., 10/9/12

by Lisa Mathias

The WG’s David Winston chatted with Chris Jansing this morning, along with former Senator Byron Dorgan about campaign finances, taxes, and the first presidential debate:

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

WSJ: Post-Debate Analysis: ‘The Game Is On’?

by Lisa Mathias

Following the first presidential debate last night, the WG’s David Winston wrote his reactions for the Washington Wire blog on the Wall Street Journal, with an overall praise of Romney’s “looking forward” toward what he plans to do, as opposed to using the “Are you better off 4 years ago?” approach:

The president focused on the past rather than looking forward – and that hurt him. Gov. Romney began to propose a future and took steps toward defining that – and it was a positive contrast.
As a result, Gov. Romney succeeded, and listening to the immediate media coverage, that seemed to be a universal consensus. At a broader level, Gov. Romney’s performance as a center-right candidate has the potential to build the natural center-right coalition in the country. The question is what does he do with this momentum?

To read more, turn to blogs.wsj.com.

« Newer PostsOlder Posts »