Read our latest musings about poltics, policy, and others out there who are making ideas matter.

The Future of Ads

by David Winston

On Wednesday, Mary Meeker, a venture capitalist at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, released her highly acclaimed annual report on Internet trends and technology. One of the findings of this year’s report was that people are trending toward mobile devices faster than ad dollars are keeping up. From the Washington Post coverage of the presentation, “Meeker sees mobile advertising growing another $22 billion in the United States because the time consumers spend on mobile devices — 25 percent — is more than double the share of ad dollars the platform receives. However, a major concern is the 420 million smartphone users who utilize ad-blocking technology.” If people are shifting toward mobile devices but with large numbers using ad blockers, ads of the future will not only have to be more adept at transitioning to mobile devices and away from traditional platforms, but the content will have to be more compelling.

To inform how ads might be more compelling, we looked at which sources are most influential in shaping political views, from research we conducted for the Ripon Society earlier this year.  Not unexpectedly, news media sources were not among the most influential sources on a person’s political views. By far, voters overall and across party cited their own experience as the largest influence on their political views (69%). Family (36%) and education (34%) fell into a second tier of most important influences, followed then by the media (29%).

Given the current media and campaign environment, these results indicate that ads of the future intended to shape views about a candidate or issue will have to be credible and informative enough for people to see the personal impact and how the content can become part of personal and family discussions. This may sound difficult, but it can be done, as exemplified by a recent exchange in a focus group in a competitive Congressional district. In that discussion, we heard a college-educated, independent female (a key voter group for this year’s midterms) describe her reaction to the provisions of the tax plan – not messaging – simply the basic provisions of the plan. After seeing the provisions of the plan and how it could impact her personally, her response was “I’m going to go home and have a drink with my husband and tell him about this stuff because I think it’s fascinating. This has been so interesting.

With the right kind of content that voters find personally relevant and informative, ads can provide content and information that can become part of personal discussions that voters are having, and those kinds of ads can have a much greater impact. The ideal reaction to an ad of any kind would be that a voter discusses it at home with family and concludes that “this has been so interesting.”

Hillary, Capitalism, and the Democratic Party

by David Winston

In a May 2nd interview, Hillary Clinton was asked if describing herself as a capitalist hurt her presidential aspirations. Her response was “probably…it’s hard to know.  But I mean if you’re in the Iowa caucuses and 41 percent of Democrats are socialists or self-described socialists, and I’m asked ‘Are you a capitalist?’ and I say ‘Yes, but with appropriate regulation and appropriate accountability.’ You know, that probably gets lost in the ‘Oh my gosh, she’s a capitalist!’” 

In the new survey from Winning the Issues (April 28-30), we asked voters if capitalism or socialism is the better economic system. One out of two voters (52%) said capitalism, with 17% answering socialism, but with about one-third (31%) that did not know. Among Democrats, the results were much more evenly split, with the largest group of Democrats (39%) being undecided on this question, and the remainder being split between capitalism (30%) and socialism (30%).

  • Moderate Democrats leaned toward capitalism (33%) over socialism (23%), but the largest percentage were undecided (44%).
  • Liberal Democrats were split among all three with a slight edge toward socialism (35%).
  • Among those who said they voted for Hillary Clinton in 2016, there was a small lead for capitalism (36%) over socialism (28%), but with another third that did not know (36%).

These results indicate that there is a significant level of debate within the Democratic Party about the merits of capitalism and socialism, and with the large percentages of undecided, there is a clear lack of consensus among Democrats about the best economic system.

 

Roll Call: When the Survey Says the Holocaust is Fading Away

by Emily O'Connor

In light of data suggesting that younger Americans are less aware of the facts around the Holocaust, WG’s David Winston reflects on a lesson learned as a teenager and the importance of passing down history:

All these years later, I now understand that when Mr. Michele decided to tell me about his life, he didn’t really mean it to be about him but about the millions who didn’t survive. He wanted me to remember the scale and the meaning of the Holocaust.

Continue reading here.

Roll Call: Is Pelosi Still the Gift that Keeps on Giving for Republicans?

by Emily O'Connor

The WG’s David Winston writes that the Democratic Leader’s value as a GOP political target may be fading:

How effective negative campaigns are or have ever been is open to debate. But there is increasing evidence that tying candidates to Pelosi as a campaign tactic may not have the impact needed to bring a race home for Republicans. Just ask Rick Saccone, the losing GOP candidate in the recent special election in Pennsylvania’s 18th District, whose campaign tried to tie Democrat Conor Lamb to Pelosi.

Continue reading here.

Roll Call: Hollywood Discovers America!

by Emily O'Connor

The WG’s David Winston’s latest piece for Roll Call looks at parallels between “Roseanne” and the concerns heard in focus groups over the past few years about living paycheck to paycheck:

Watching Roseanne Barr’s second act last week, I realized as I listened to her character vent about her family’s economic situation that she would have fit right in with most of these voters. Her issues in the sitcom were the same ones that drove the 2016 election — jobs and the economy coupled with people’s growing frustration that their government seems unable to deliver solutions to their problems.

Continue reading here.

Roll Call: If the Generic Ballot Is a Midterms Canary, It’s a Cagey One

by Emily O'Connor

What does the generic ballot actually mean, especially this far out from a midterm election? The WG’s David Winston dives in:

Between now and November, there will be much speculation about the generic ballot and what it “predicts” for control of Congress. Political context and survey methodology should always be taken into consideration when putting eggs in the “generic ballot” basket.

Continue reading here. 

Roll Call: It’s Déjà vu All Over Again in Southwest Pennsylvania

by Emily O'Connor

The WG’s David Winston explains similarities between the PA-18 special election and a similar defeat for Republicans in 2010:

“In 2010, the special election in Pennsylvania’s 12th District was a tough loss when history dictated Republicans should’ve expected to pick up seats in congressional elections in a nonpresidential year. In reality, that defeat ended up being a gift to the GOP. The unexpected loss jolted Republicans out of their complacency.”

Continue reading here. 

Roll Call: Trump Can’t Help Stepping on His Own Message

by Emily O'Connor

The WG’s David Winston argues that despite his innate ability to drive the media cycle, President Trump is unable to capitalize on his accomplishments:

This inability to deliver a singular message and maintain a news focus has plagued this president and his communications team since Day One, and his own popularity is paying a heavy price. With the economy roaring, jobs and wages rising, ISIS defeated and a tax reform bill passed and gaining approval, clearly his favorability numbers ought to be higher.

Continue reading here.

Roll Call: Democrats’ Own Spanish Inquisition Could Burn Party

by Emily O'Connor

The WG’s David Winston explains how the ascendency of the “Resistance” on the Left may hurt Democrats in November.

A particular brand of progressivism rooted in the “Resistance” is growing in its distemper and disassociation with what these activists see as outdated, traditional Democratic ideology, further dividing their leaderless and, as they see it, increasingly aimless Democratic Party.

Continue reading here. 

Roll Call: Trump’s Negatives are the Biggest, but Are they Also the Best?

by Emily O'Connor

The WG’s David Winston discusses what the President’s unique ability to win votes despite high unfavorables means for Republicans in November:

Most of the conclusions that predict doom for the GOP are based, not unreasonably, on the impact of presidential job approval on the political environment. But what we should not forget is that President Donald Trump has had strange numbers since Day One.

Continue reading here. 

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