The Winston Group is a strategy and research firm dedicated to making ideas matter.

What Voters Want

by Emily O'Connor

From our 2014 post-election analysis:

As a result of voter unhappiness not only about the economy but moving forward generally, people expect Republicans in Congress to focus their efforts on proposing and passing policies to improve the economy (71%). They didn’t vote for Republicans simply to be a check and balance on President Obama (23%)…

Ultimately, what this reflects is a country that continues to be unhappy with the current direction of the economy and have decided to give Republicans more governing responsibility…

What policies were most important to voters? What did they think of the role of government? Keep reading here.

No Matter What Party, This Was Voters’ #1 Issue in the 2014 Midterms

by Emily O'Connor

From our 2014 post-election analysis:

As the 2014 campaign unfolded, the economy remained the number one issue.

Our post-election survey showed that the top issue overwhelmingly was the economy/jobs, with no other issue coming close. This was true across ideology, party, race, age, gender – virtually any subgroup of the electorate you could define.

 

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President Obama tried to argue that an economic recovery, spurred by his policies, was moving the country forward, but that argument failed to resonate with an electorate that was simply not feeling the recovery. In fact, in the exit poll, 78% of the country said they were worried about the direction the economy would take next year and only 28% said their family’s financial situation had improved over the last two years.

Clearly, the country was looking for better solutions to fix the economy.

Read our full 2014 post-election analysis.

Discussion Points: More than Words

by Lisa Mathias

In our second video of our new Discussion Points series, we discuss the importance of having not only a good message, but a good plan to back it up. We also take a look at how President Reagan served as an example of this concept.

WaPo: Some House Republicans untouched by campaign for immigration overhaul

by Lisa Mathias

In an article published on August 12, the Washington Post addresses the issue of immigration and turns to David Winston for insight on how Republican leaders should approach the issue:

“These Republican members are reflecting their constituents, so the challenge isn’t pressuring the Republican members, the challenge is to come up with a convincing and compelling argument for their constituents to agree to,” said GOP pollster David Winston, who advises House Republicans.

To read the full article, turn to washingtonpost.com.

National Review: “Memo to GOP: Ideas Win Elections”

by Lisa Mathias

In today’s National Review Online, the WG’s David Winston writes a piece on how the Republican Party needs to win on the issues and stop campaigning with negative advertising.

As important as Republican core principles are, it is the potential outcomes those principles and ideas generate that, in the end, win elections. How effectively Republican candidates translate these ideas into clear policies will determine whether the party succeeds in the future.

To read the full article, click to nationalreview.com.

David Winston on Jansing & Co., February 6, 2013

by Lisa Mathias

The WG’s David Winston appeared on MSNBC’s Jansing & Co. on February 6 to comment on President Obama’s appointment of Sally Jewell as Secretary of Interior:

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

2012 Post-Election Analysis

by David Winston

Access the .pdf here: 2012 Post-Election Analysis

Infographic: Mitt Romney’s Vote Margins

by Lisa Mathias

Young voters played a decisive role in the 2012 presidential election. According to the exit polls, Barack Obama received fewer votes than Mitt Romney among voters over the age of 30, but won young voters – nationally and in key swing states – by such large margins that he was re-elected.

WSJ: Political Pros: What the Final Debate Means

by Lisa Mathias

For the third and final presidential debate of this election season, the WG’s David Winston continues his series writing for the Wall St. Journal’s Washington Wire blog. Winston gives his reaction to Monday night’s debate, stating that Governor Romney succeeded in his tactic of avoiding attacking Obama and instead offering his ideas:

…Mr. Romney came to the debate with a strategy that avoided harsh attacks on Mr. Obama’s foreign-policy record, instead offering voters his own foreign-policy direction for the future. Several times during the debate when Mr. Obama went on the offensive, Mr. Romney calmly told the president he was more interested in talking about where each of them would take the country rather than engaging a rhetorical war of attrition.

To read the full post, turn to blogs.wsj.com.

Infographic: Which devices do you get more of your news from?

by David Winston

Recently, Newsweek announced that it will no longer be producing a print version of the iconic magazine. No matter what business concerns lead to that decision, one fact that must be acknowledged is that there are dramatic changes happening in how Americans consume news. The Winston Group recently conducted a survey that asked respondents which electronic devices they use to get their news. Here is what we found:

Among the “Overall” responses, television was still the most popular device, but computers were a reasonably close second, well ahead of radio. Additionally, radio is beginning to see some stiff competition from smartphones.

But the advantage in audience size that television has over computers and the lead that radio has over smartphones disappears when you look at younger members of the population. Among 35-44 year olds, smart phones and tablets are already outpacing radio as a source of news. When you look at 18-44 year olds, the results are even more striking with computers dominate as a source of news, outpacing television, with smartphones beginning to challenge for second spot.

So while not every magazine will incur the same fate as Newsweek, there can be no doubt that the media landscape has already changed for the youngest members of the adult population.

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