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Bloomberg Politics: “He Won Two, But Obama’s Speech Shows There’s Always a Next Election”

by Emily O'Connor

How might the policies President Obama addressed in the State of the Union speech affect the 2016 elections? The WG’s David Winston comments in Bloomberg Politics:

Republicans argue that Obama’s economic policies will only hurt Clinton. They say the results of the 2014 midterm elections, in which Republicans won back the Senate and expanded on their majority in the House, repudiated those policies. “It puts her in a very difficult position,” Republican pollster David Winston said of Hillary Clinton. “The public has said in exit polls they don’t agree with that argument. And she’s supposed to carry that ball?”

For the rest of the story, click here.

Diane Rehm Show: “Analysis of President Obama’s 2015 State of the Union Address”

by Emily O'Connor

The WG’s David Winston was a guest on the Diane Rehm Show’s analysis of President Obama’s 2015 State of the Union Address. Here’s a few highlights from his thoughts on the speech:

Listen to the whole show here, and be sure to follow The Winston Group on Twitter.

 

USA Today: “Analysis: A better economy, a more hostile Congress”

by Emily O'Connor

Last night, President Obama delivered the 2015 State of the Union address. The WG’s David Winston sets the stage for the analysis of the speech, highlighting what Republicans were watching for:

“When he came in, he had a filibuster-proof Senate and an overwhelming majority in the House, and now he’s facing a Republican Congress and the largest House membership for Republicans since the ’20s,” said GOP pollster David Winston, an adviser to Republican congressional leaders. He said the GOP was watching to see whether Obama would “double-down” on policies they argue the electorate already has rejected.

Did they get their answer? The rest of the story can be found here.

WashPo: “Obama will give State of Union address against backdrop of deep partisan divide”

by Emily O'Connor

In the Washington Post, the WG’s David Winston discusses President Obama’s actions since the 2014 midterm elections, just before the 2015 State of the Union address:

“Given how poorly the election went for them, they need to find some way to derive a narrative,” David Winston, president of the Winston Group, a conservative consulting firm, said of the White House. On the president’s executive actions, he added, “There’s only so many he can do. . . . Ultimately, they have to figure out as a White House how to actually interact and get things done at a national level.”

Read rest of the story here.

Washington Examiner: “Obama’s leftward lurch poisons hope for consensus”

by Emily O'Connor

Ahead of the 2015 State of the Union address, the WG’s David Winston tells the Washington Examiner what he’ll be looking for, and how voters’ feelings about the role of government have changed:

“I’ll be looking at the State of the Union address to see if [Obama] understood what happened in the last election or whether he just ignores it,” said David Winston, a veteran GOP pollster. “When a party ignores when the American people have spoken, it’s usually a dangerous moment for that party.”

Winston cited exit polls in the last four elections since 2008 when Obama was voted in office. When it comes to whether government should do more or less to solve the nation’s problems, Winston’s polls show a sharp swing against government solutions since Obama was first elected.

In 2008, amid a real estate correction that threatened large financial institutions, 51 percent of those surveyed said they believed government should do more to solve the country’s problems. In 2010, that number shrank to 38 percent. Support for more government intervention in markets was 44 percent in 2012 and 41 percent in 2014.

Read the rest of the story here.

McClatchy DC: “Can Republicans lead? That’s what they – and others – want to know”

by Emily O'Connor

In an article from McClatchy DC discussing the challenges and opportunities that are ahead for Republican leaders, the WG’s David Winston comments on what message voters sent through the midterms and how Republicans can proceed:

“What Republicans do with this opportunity will be central to how the brand evolves,” Republican pollster David Winston wrote in a post-election strategy memo. “It’s important to understand that the election showed the public is willing to listen to Republican ideas, but voters have to be sold on each individual idea first. Republicans do not have carte blanche, but they have an electorate that is willing to listen to Republican ideas to fix the country. That is a unique opportunity for any political party.”

Here’s the rest of the story, and the rest of the post-election analysis.

LA Times: Obama jumps ahead of Congress, highlighting economy in Michigan visit

by Emily O'Connor

The WG’s David Winston comments in the LA Times on President Obama’s actions since the midterm elections:

“It’s almost like he’s pretending it didn’t happen,” said Republican pollster David Winston, an advisor to congressional leaders. “Elections are statements from the electorate about how things are going. And they made a pretty clear statement.”

Winston argued that the White House appeared to be missing what he said was the message of the midterm: that Americans wanted a different policy direction and to see leaders in Washington working together.

Read the rest of the story from the LA Times, and be sure to check out our post-election analysis to understand more about what statements voters made through the midterms.

WashEx: “Elections an opportunity, not a mandate, for GOP, polling shows”

by Emily O'Connor

The Washington Examiner highlighted the WG’s post-election analysis “Fix It” in an article describing why the 2014 midterms provided Republicans with an opportunity, rather than a mandate:

“It’s important to understand that the election showed the public is willing to listen to Republican ideas but voters have to be sold on each individual idea first,” Winston explained. “Republicans do not have carte blanche, but they have an electorate that is willing to listen to Republican ideas to fix the country. That is a unique opportunity for any political party.”

…“The brand challenge for Republicans is to turn winning the issues into favorables and expand their midterm majority coalition,” Winston said in his report. “Newt Gingrich once said: ‘Walmart doesn’t get ahead by attacking Sears, but by offering better value.’ That captures the Republican challenge going forward.”

Read the rest of the article here.

Get the rest of our post-election analysis here.

Washington Examiner: “Survey: Hillary Clinton too liberal for most voters”

by Emily O'Connor

This week, a finding from the Winston Group’s post-election survey was featured in the Washington Examiner’s “Washington Secrets” column –

Ideological Spectrum - 2014

 

Pollster David Winston provided Secrets with his latest analysis that included his trademark political sliding scale that for the first time tested the public’s opinion of Clinton’s political pulse.

He found that on a scale of 1 for liberal to 9 for conservative, voters put Clinton at 3.6, to the left of the House Democratic Caucus and just shy of Obama’s 3.37, the most liberal on the chart. Voters put themselves at a right-of-center 5.79, a yawning 2 points away from Clinton…

“Looking at 2016, the ideological spectrum should [be] concerning for Democrats, especially the likely front-runner Hillary Clinton. The good news for her is voters put her to the right of President Obama. The bad news for her is voters put her significantly to the left of where they put themselves ideologically,” Winston said.

Read the whole story here, or take a look at everything else we covered in our post-election analysis.

What Voters Want

by Emily O'Connor

From our 2014 post-election analysis:

As a result of voter unhappiness not only about the economy but moving forward generally, people expect Republicans in Congress to focus their efforts on proposing and passing policies to improve the economy (71%). They didn’t vote for Republicans simply to be a check and balance on President Obama (23%)…

Ultimately, what this reflects is a country that continues to be unhappy with the current direction of the economy and have decided to give Republicans more governing responsibility…

What policies were most important to voters? What did they think of the role of government? Keep reading here.

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